Final Farewell for Dave Bush?

Milwaukee Brewers starting pitcher Dave Bush reacts to Los Angeles Dodgers batter Rod Barajas' three-run home run in the sixth inning of their MLB National League game in Milwaukee, Wisconsin August 24, 2010.   REUTERS/Allen Fredrickson  (UNITED STATES - Tags: SPORT BASEBALL)

Dave Bush likely pitched his last game for the Milwaukee Brewers on Wednesday night.  Much like Prince Fielder hitting a home run and walking in what was likely his last home game as a Brewer, Bush’s (likely) last outing was a fitting way to end his Brewer career.  In six innings, he scattered a few hits, didn’t strike out many (only one batter), and walked a few (including the pitcher).

It was a solid, yet unspectacular, start.  Throughout his five seasons in Milwaukee, he was a solid, yet unspectacular starter.

As a free agent who’s simply too expensive to keep around as a fifth starter, Bush likely ends his tenure in Milwaukee with an ERA of 4.80 over exactly 870 innings, a 1.313 WHIP, 9.4 H/9, 1.3 HR/9, 2.4 BB/9, and 6.3 K/9.  That K/9 ratio actually ranks 7th all-time in Brewers history, but his BB/9 also ranks as the 7th highest.  His 2.61 K/BB ratio is actually the second best in club history, behind only Ben Sheets — a testament to how good his control once was.

Despite the consistently solid results, Bush always seemed like a guy that you were looking to replace.  Hell, I’m sure I wrote more than a few times that Bush should be the one to lose his rotation spot when things started to get crowded.  With the team struggling to find pitching that was better than him, though, he managed to stick around.  That’s not meant as a knock on Bush, because on a team that continues to rank near the bottom of the league in nearly every pitching category, he was at least consistent.

I suppose it’s still possible that Bush returns next season if the Brewers can’t find a suitable replacement in the rotation.  With so many young arms on the verge of being ready for big league duty, though, it wouldn’t be fair to Bush to bring him back with the intention of replacing him halfway through the season.  I hope he’s able to find a rotation spot somewhere, specifically in a ballpark that plays better towards his strengths and hides his weaknesses (namely, his tendency to give up home runs).

He pitched well in Citi Field, and the Mets may be looking to add a starter or two this offseason.  Who knows, maybe his last appearance as a Brewer will end up being against his future employer.  I’ve been harsh on him lately, but I do hope he manages to stick around for a little while longer.  There are certainly worse everyday starters out there.

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